Everything about Brooklyn math-rock trio Peaer‘s latest album, A Healthy Earth, is calculated: the record, out August 16, is meticulously constructed and highly rhythmic, with every note falling into place exactly as it’s expected to. Though at times predictable, the music is also both sophisticated and cool, and the 11 indie-rock tracks make for a stellar release.

334502.pngThe record opens with “Circle,” a track that feels representative of the album as a whole: it kicks off with a high-pitched drone before launching into a set of neatly-organized drum beats and punchy guitar riffs. Vocalist and guitarist Peter Katz’s voice is dry, and a bass guitar line from bassist and vocalist Thom Lombardi keeps the track dark and gritty.

At times, the music lightens, but still, its sound is unified. The album maintains that same post-punk and math-rock feel throughout, even when the music gets less grungy, and it’s colorful and cool and captivating all at once.

Near the middle, for example, “Commercial” is mellow while still upholding a consistently alternative sound, and pretty harmonies add a new texture as the music builds and then breaks the tension in a cathartic release. It’s a catchy and enthralling track that splits the album with a remarkable amount of energy.

A Healthy Earth shows a maturity, too; the three musicians use a composition technique called “text painting,” where the sound of the music almost literally reflects its lyrical content. In “Ollie,” for example, the song is about Katz’s dog, and the bass clarinet solo is inspired by the image of a puppy running in circles.

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Photo by Marcus Maddox.

A Healthy Earth shows off both Peaer’s maturity and musical talent through a variety of rhythms, melodies and textures, but despite the slight variations in sound, the record feels cohesive and planned regardless. It truly is a stunning release, though it is just another in a storied discography. To check out the record, stream the first few singles and preorder Peaer’s A Healthy Earth via Bandcamp below.

Originally published on Indientry on August 15, 2019.